What I’ve been weaving over the Holidays

Weave, sleep, weave, repeat.

It’s official, I’m obsessed with weaving! I decided that while I actually have the time, I might as well concentrate on improving my weaving skills and producing better weaves. So I started with making them a little bigger. I’m enjoying the whole experience so much so that I’m now in the progress of starting up my own shop through Etsy! I’ll do a follow up blog soon and let you know where to find it and how it’s going.

In the meantime, here are a couple of my recent weaves that I’ll be adding to the shop once it’s up and running!

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DIY Loom and Weaves

Weave wall hangings are a popular home accessory right now and they can make a house feel homely and lived in, plus fit in any room – big or small. I figured a weave wall hanging would make a perfect addition to my home and be a fun alternative to standard photos or paintings on the wall. But they don’t come cheap. After a quick search online, I found that retailers were selling handmade weaves for £20 upwards, with some reaching the £100 mark. For me, this was out of the budget so I decided to get crafty and make my own. 

Firstly, I needed to make a loom. This is the basic apparatus used to construct the weaving. These are also expensive to buy. If you don’t know what a loom looks like, it is simply a wooden frame which has pegs along the top and bottom. This can easily be constructed from an old wooden picture frame, by hammering tacks at an equal distance along the top and bottom. 

What else I used: Wool, Scissors, Bodkin, Wooden dowel, String, Fork. Simple!

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To get started, tie a knot around the first tack and then wrap the string around the tacks from top to bottom until you reach the last tack, then tie another knot. After, weave under and over with the wool across the string base to create the weave. Use a fork to push the wool down to the bottom of the loom and work your way upwards, repeating the same steps.

To create tassels at the bottom of the weave, cut wool double the length of desired tassel and take four strands at a time, centre under the first set of top and bottom string wraps and then pull out the wool from between the two wraps slightly. Take the ends of the wool over the wraps and under the centre piece of wool and pull. Repeat these steps with the next pair of wraps and then the next until you reach the last. 

When the weave is complete, cut the top string wraps and tie each pair around the wooden dowel. Finish off with a string attached to the dowel to hang your weave. There are limitless patterns you can create using the loom and with practice, your weaves will develop into masterpieces. I thoroughly enjoy making my weaves as a hobby and recently started selling them! Give it a go. 

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